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Full text of "Annual Calendar of the Frances Shimer Academy of the University of Chicago, Vol. 1 No. 1"

Calendar 



OF 



the Frances Shimer Academy 



OF THE 



UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

hPHUATBD WITH THE t MYERSTTY OF CH1CAOC 



Vol. I No. i. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

C al e nda r for 1385-7 - Art Departs: : 

Officers of Government and Instruction 3 Bvoumob Goone - . . 

Situation. BuU&a^ and Groi; 3 Expenses 

A : ■ mmm - .... 4 Discipline 

tatoodbaet -;. Ywm 4 Pergonal Care 

rriculu: - 5 eral Information 

* oo Curriculum 6 Relation of the Academy to 31 1 Carroll Seminary 

Outline of Inttrcction ...... 6 and to The UairersitT of Chicago - 

ItapailiiH*! ... 9 Needs of the Acaden. 



10 
11 
11 

n 

13 



JUNE, 1896 



CHICAGO 
K|c Hnibersitg of £i)icago $ress 

1896 






CALENDAR 



SEPTE 



BER , ,8,6-JUNE, .8 97 . 









m ft Tunday Firsl Perm of Spring^ 

-*. f,*tTi*"<* A: ^ begins. 

JS**"« ilh,A * Apr- 17. Saturday First IVrm of Spring Qllari 
rincwlSun.: endfl ' 

S,turJiy FSrtt Ttam rf Aalumn Quarter ^ ^ Spring Vacation. 

if.:-. 



<M,a fee* ftcorilta-.lAut.MQ^ .^ 27- ru « d «y Second^rm of Spring Q 0art 
Tbttrtdij Ihasiscitiso Day; a holiday v >> 



Dte 6. Sttuidty SewndTeimof Aatmaa Quar- 
ter ends. 

Dk, & TuwdiT Fiirt Tera of Winter Quarter 



Friday CJaasRecital by Pupils of Assist- 
ant Instructors in Mu 



J", i Tueriij SttMamncd. 



May 14. Friday 



May 21. Friday 



** & *rt*8«riT*iadWi 



P ^ * Sltttrti; v 



to begin 



»ter Qair 



'*sr *»»•; . 



r 28. Friday 

* 



Class Recital by Pupils of the 
Principal of tin* piano 
Department. 

Class Recital by Pupils of thi 
Principal of the V 
Department. 

Demonstrative Recital by Pi) 
Graduates 






thf 



■jar- J uue 8. 
June 9 



Demoaatrativa Recital by 
Graduates in Vocal Music. 

Baooalaubkatb Skbm 



BCi; 



Tuesday OoinuoroBlfMiT Ex* 
nosday Conservatory Concert 



^ 0Wes «wrhj to tk. „ * * awncky fr» fw T^ * Saturday Tk 

^^E^ th, ZJa^ a,Iv; " lt ^- of thin arrangement are: 

""^^ ^.SS ■'■"Sunday removed : and the 



study. 




OFFICERS OF GOVERNMENT AND INSTRUCTION 



tore J Miller. Pe.D„ Principal 

■ 



WML. 



amice r of 






Ainiift - 



in 



Gabdxeb, A.M.. Dean and Instructor 
History. 

* < c?T ¥ PaMj* School* of Rhode Man. 

of Prir. School 

IT at Sam: 

SS2SJ??-# f ir* Ttt *f^ TMchin*. Philadelphia. : 
r*a Academy, Warren. 111., L£_ 

William Tilto.v Wjxecar, &B., Instructor in Science 
and Mathematics. 



n 



A**i*rant Principal io Township High School, v 

;r«a^o«Jeat of School*, Westrii: 

rtfan Indiana Bura*. CoUoie. B Wbera 

lodiaii* Normal School, IS92; So- 
SviCb^IlL, lise-4: Special Stedeat of Biology. T; 

rfcSSf^SJl^Sl 1 iMtnietorui BioJogj-C:' School*, 

Ka«o,lSfi6: PnxeOrator, The LtuTeraitj of Chicago, 159ft. 

Hasbtet GEBraroB Blaisx. AJL, Instructor in Latin 
and Greek, 

Teacher in EhFTia. 0- a-R, Obcrlin Colic**. 1990; 

Cataloguer, Oberlin rary, 1S9Q-1; Head Cata- 

F*™!** tU ir WW-3; Te«cher of Latin, Ot> 
Ji^gjE Student, The University of Chicago, IS&-S; A.M., 



Kxowlto>\ A.B,. Instructor in English. 



'ndiaha-.. 
- 
<*ea£o. liSC-6. 



"i IMU 1 '. 



■c* 



in 



Jam Chapw Tt S.B., General Assistant 

ace. Mathematics, and English. 

ibid iKR' at ^ihrariaa, 

1SK-3: Gr*<: t m English and Hi* tun Th* i~*V 

ity of Chicago, 139&-G, ' ■»«*•*■ The t m. 

May II all. Recorder and Insl in German. 

Teacher in Ht, Carroll Seiiiiaary. StmUni eJ 

-uanandM.ihematic- 

Teacher in Mt. Carroll & ii*3-6. M «S°- «**** 

tx Dearborn Hazzes, Director of Musical 
Dfierratotj, 

Trained oader John O'Seil. Carl Zerrahn. Madame Edna 
Hall and other noted aniftt* of Boston, and Prof. Mary A, 
Cnmer of \\ elledey College. ^^ 

Luella Totten, Principal of Department of Instru- 
mental Music. 

Trained under W, H. Sherwood of Cbieajfo, and duties three 
jeans itnd j in Europe by Klindwort of Berlin and L**cne- 
omkz o4 % icbm. 

Maky Cl-mrf Sbeewqod, Instructor in Art and 

Assistant in Instrumental Music 

Art education recerrpd at the Art Inetitnt* of Botton and 
the Student*' Art League of New York. Trained ms»icallr 
in the method of \V. H. Shcrroad of Chicajro. 

Florence Tcrxey, Assistant in Preparatory Depart- 
ment, 



I. SITUATION, BUILDING, AND GROUNDS. 

The Academy is situated at Mt. Carroll, DL, the 
county-seat of Carroll county, one hundred and 
twenty-eight miles west of Chicago on the Chicago, 
Milwaukee and St- Paul Railroad, which by its South- 
west and Pacific divisions brings the school into direct 
communication with Chicago, Omaha, Kansas Cit 
Milwaukee and Rock Island, and through these with 
parts of the count 

The town of Mt. Carroll is ten miles from the Mis- 
I'pi River, beautifully located among picturesque 
hills, and is justly celebrated for its beauty and 
faithfulness. 

3 



The grounds consist of twenty-five acres planted 
with ornamental and fruit-bearing trees. A fine 
kitchen garden supplies the table with fresh vege- 
tables. The Academy stands on high land and looks 
off over a landscape rich and varied. The building 
is supplied with hard and soft water, is well heated, 
and the corridors and first floor are lighted by elec- 
tricity. 

It is proposed as soon as possible to erect a m 
building, which shall contain a large assembly hall. 
laboratory, gymnasium, and ample class rooms thor- 
oughly equipped for the best methods of instruc- 
tion. 



T0M Fi:A 






>/// 






commercial Geography. Incorrect 



lam- 

S 



g».urc« "V^jMl n»m» in Ibe eiumiution win 



t'B (trade. 

streets tAe tfme »/ "'« examina 



5 



£*«» - atliui 



i aim to teet the 



Nation for ftdmiflfiion will he given 
^^rSSl-lfcM*- « will begia at 
«» >"" Garr ? ^at about 1 p.m. the earned 
s-30 a-M- » nd cl 

subjects English and Arithmetic 
6 . Qt the aDOW . ^Hng admission than the 

M have mare weig^ . ffiportant Bubjcct ia EnglW,. 



, r. in** I ttw K^^ FU , WiU ^ The meet important subject » r.ngLisn. 

lit' ^frlmoo Factor. ^ other two, ^ aUy more deficient in Enghsh ud 

** ,;r,:i ' SS»»1 ***** 4 PP BC8D ? ^ n Ttfhmeticand Geography. 

fiJ *2ffi£25 »« H^torythanmAr.th, 



-in l* reauifW *° ^ ... ._i t., : : 



; avalvmg lit**! qua ^ orin ^ tf 

po.,- be a part of the 

.Widate will be **"• v h , the , ao d,. 

■abject*. 



/// 



JAT1JOD UCTOB Y YEA R 



The introductory Year has been provided becauee 

experience has shown that, in many instances high 
Smuil in college preparation is made impowfak 
bv the lack ..f a solid foundation in elementary sub- 
.' and because that kind of elementary instruction 
2 In English the examinatfon will inelud. ft - B prnp(irl y introductory to a preparatory course 

•In»l. wi => '"elation, denDin *' «™P 081l,0I > is ^ mailable in some localities. The Introductory 

writing, and Eogfeh Grammar. English Grammar ^ aloviae8 for those who fail in the whole or 
.hould be m taught as to be the V**V*a»W a t o( the ontrance examinations, giving them an 
toa P upiUbo Ut tob, pD the8t^o(U»n_ Whit wrtunitvtocoml , te their preparation umlor ad va, 

ad Lack wood n or Meiklejuhn & Emjlieh Gram- . " " 
mar. or Harper and Burgess' Inductive Studies in ticwug conditions- 
EoglUh Grammar will indicate the sort of prcpara* 

lion expected, COURSE OF STUDY FOB THE INTRODUCTORY YEAR- 



tion expected, 
% In Hi story an elementary 



sr. « n UKnV i V bu wwuduuuj acquaintance with the 
ttheDnil s will be 

^ouhlbeanabunOa: ;i ai ng 

and 



te,l ThrreshouMbeanabundan, intr ™« h * 

that will «rr e to twaken Lotemt In the subject and (,tr " ra ^ h >- 

11 familiar with the tpirit of the times -- ^ UisU>ry ' 
Dat^Bhoul^ beuiwht tDariiiDl. 



4utdks and Winter Ql-abtee*. 
Arithrm ' 



naake the pupil fai 

•fat***- i>^^ taSZK E ^-soicn;;, 

a :.' 1 W : ,h . iudgmP! ™-t emphr - 



Spring Qcajeti 
Arithmetic, 
English, 
Geography, 

►metric Forma 
Elem. Scionc 



*.b.i,i„,o,,. ; 1 ,ta "»«'»i.iMv 11 , Ji . 






_ 



tV. THE CURRICULUM. 

llB ?f. Academ y °ff«™ three courses of study baad 
J^wgiwaente for the degrees of A.B.. ^ B - 

;'^« whib,t the arrangement of studies in each 



pi H 

9 g 



Ci RRioclph fob Deo BM of 







Tin: LOWBB ACADEMY, 
rirat Soar. *? 
_ Second 



Latin, 
History, 
Algebra. 
English, 



Lit tin, 
History, 
Algebra, 
English, 





? 




u 




£ 


< 


** 


2 

-y 


-: 




s 
£ 


i 


§, 


* 


s 



Latin. 

bra. 
History. 
English, 



p 

< 

— » 
- 



a 



Latin, 
Algebra, 
1 »ry, 

English. 



Latin, 

A Igebra, 
History, 

English, 



Latin. 
Algebra, 

History. 
English, 



porwk. 
5 
5 



Latin, 
Greek, 

English, 

Geome try 

Latin, 

Greek, 

English. 

Geom etry, 



Recital 
per 



Latin, 
Greek, 
Geometry, 
English/ 



Latin. 
Greek, 
Geometry, 
English, 



Latin, 
»ek, 

Geometry, 
English, 



Latin, 

Greek, 

Geometry, 

English, 



ion* 

5 

I 

4 

6 
5 
4 
1 



THK HIGHER 
KirKt Yea*. 



ACADEMY. 

"«l Year. 



Latin, 
Greek, 
Physic 
Geometry, 

Latin, 

Greek, 

Physics, 

Geometry. 



It JOHN 

per wk, 
5 
5 
5 



Latin, 5 

Greek, 5 

Physics, 5 

Algebra & Geometry, 4 



Latin, r> 

Greek, 5 

Physics, 

Algebra & Geometry, 4 



Latin, 5 

Greek, 5 

Physics, 5 

Algebra & Geometry, 4 



Latin, ."> 

t Jreek, 5 

Physics, 5 

Algebra i Geometry, 4 



Latin, 

German or French, 5 
English, 5 

Greek, 5 

5 
5 



Latin, 

man or French, 

English, 
Greek, 



Latin, 5 

Greek, 5 

German or French, 5 

ish, 5 

r, 
Greek, 

German or French* G 
English, 5 



Latin, 5 

< treek, 5 

German or French, 5 

English. g 

Latin, f> 

5 

German or French, "> 

English, 5 



Curriculum for Degree of Ph,B, 



- 1 






a ( 



THE LOWER ACADEMY. 



First Year. 



Latin, 

Algebra, 

History, 

English, 



Latin. 

Algebra, 

History, 

English, 



Latin, 

Algebra. 
History, 
English, 



Latin, 

Algebra, 
History, 
English, 



5 s 

» -2. 



Latin, 
Algebra, 
History, 
English, 






Latin, 
Algebra, 
History, 
English, 



Recitations 
per wk. 
5 
5 
5 
2 



Second Year, 



Reel tat torn* 
por wk 
Latin, 

German or French, 5 
Geometry, 4 

English, 4 



Latin, 

German. 

Geometry, 

English, 



Latin, 5 

German or French, 5 

Geometry, 4 

English, 4 



Latin, 5 

German or French, 6 

Geometry, 4 

English, 4 



Latin, 5 

German or French, 5 
Geometry, 4 

English, 4_ 



Latin, 5 

German or French, 5 

Geometry, 4 

English, 4 



THE HIGHER ACADEMY. 
FirKt Year* Second 



Recitation* 

pec wk. 

Latin, 6 

German or French. 5 

Physics, 5 

metry, i 



Latin, 5 

German or French, 5 

Physics* 5 

Geometry, 4 



Latin, 

man 
Physics, 
Algebra 



or French, 5 

5 

a- Geometry* 4 



Latin, 

man 
Physics, 

Algebra 



or French, 

5 
& Geometry, i 



Latin, 
German 

Physics. 
Algebra 

Latin, 

nan 
Physics, 



or French, 5 



& Geometry, 4 

5 

or French, 5 

5 



& Geometry. 4 



Recital 

pec wk. 

Latin. 5 

German or French, 5 

History, 5 

English, 5 

Latin, 5 

German or French, 5 

History, 5 

English, 5 



Latin, 5 

( lerman or French, 5 
History, 

English, 



Latin, 

( German or French, 

History, 

English, 



Latin, 

German or French, 

History, 

English, 



in, 
German or French, 5 

History, 
English, 



r/'fr 







V^ur 




«*****■ *~ 



gIGHBB A< 

% . - . . ■ 



m or 




■ > 
5 
5 
■i 



„r Preach, 

Fhy^ 

ruetry^ — 

-in or French 
physics. 
Geometry. 




Second Yf> ar 



German or Fr 

Biology, 

History, 

English, 



German or FreochT 
Biology, 
History, 
English 



Geoo 

-h . __ 

rich, 
ar. or F: 



laaotFr 



2 E 






r French. K 

x Geometry^ 

5 

German or V reneh, o, 

nan or French, a 
bra & Geometry, 4 

Tar „ v t 

manor French, ■_* 

tometry, I 



German or French^ 



Biology, 

History, 
glish, 

il-Ttnan or French, 
Biology, 

History, 
English. 



:uan or French, 
Biology, 
History, 

j lish, 

German or French, 

Biology, 

History, 

English, 



SOT: IPJf. 



..•'Lover Academy 
ladt. - \c*imy. The first half ol the Cur- 

r3(of 

nriaftbi 

^mntaCtUrtj^xve^K..- 

toovu m lfc* Higher Acatomy. 

'«wtonorta^|it vevkl(a A Fj4r . 



4. While the curriculum is based upon the ratnm 
< of the several courses in The Universr 
of Chicago a ample preparation for any 

or university. 

i Certificates. TheAcademj :' 

certificate of membership inn 
Big . issued to students who have com- 

pleted :.. r Courses or 6X Cnn 

BBoood, the Academy Certificate, grant -';'*** 

*ho hare completed 3£» Major Cours - ' 

its. The Academy certificate aJ: 
dent without further examination to The l*ni««* 
°t Chicago, 






'~«~<-.~ 



***** *f 



'«**«*, 



OVTUXE OF INSTRUCTION* IS 
BJECT* 

LAS 

^rwof rtud, in Latin : 3ed. « 

wE* !° Ur y "" *° d consisting of 12 Ma* " 
J~7j* »» course is at ] t ' 

2*^. to The University of C 
• W»wWi to enter the SB. < 






77/ 



l^^f 1 T^f"*,*** -*»*** ^ ^ 



. 



*trt is L*tf : , 

facility io lh* i^* of the ^nptw: that *r£r 
eaiaeoUrv 

tamut aim wffl be to am the p 

" ' ' *"- ' L - : - a : -: u -• v- n ... 

■ ' * ** "'-■ ' - \ v: hm. y befc^3 

i& Other things wiB be sacrificed to gm& 
end. Only those gr ammati cal fact* ■ leaned 

■ riding. a»d iatsaiitfent 

l;:- .: " f au l.:;_ - v .. be expected, ~ * h 

« wifl be le! 
I«S*»w* read «■ traoafcLtwi to 

• ■-' i-r .: raartilawtj I r advwBjd 
nd c* their teaches* is speeia&y asked to the 



. . . . 
all and a ncnra rt ei vo G abxlasry & comxuac 

Eke mRWBg ■ Benteocse mar be* 

' '-' "-' ' '*' ■■ -' "- ortfer -/ flbt La.*, 7.. Bai by 
faidtt^ first the «bj redicate. 






- ''■■•.'. * • -;■_,. -^- t **iLrt - r even mi' 
■: '-:- i : - 

Qaies xz» izufi auhjccJ. has been moatf marked. L*t 
<*■») ■ a i lii aHihfl aid be regarded aa a most raJuab. 
. 'jsibnhtry . forma, sod syntax. With'. 

an inadflqaate trama^. SodhCTWaaBagmst 

■ 



■ 



■_._ 1 1 aa ribMtf be bane 

. . . 

^^■hwi and the cases should r 
j£ order, 

^«ntki& aho-. 

i mfieetiofci 

the 4f tuttitii v of rvveil ahot 

•jfMafe*. 



iqp assail 




B*n K 



i**troction h 

iit»g Greek i}. 

d tuainly to the study 






-e tseafc 



Sfl 'j we*,- 

■ana. sjr*> 

OTBgh it' 



^Jb* similarta that described 



audi fe 

::tre e*r* ' 
taasai vf atjJe be iz 

^a .sabolar 

possible. 

■ 

lafijruage bearing saaoy marks erf kinship with 

itiore t» of 1 
I casta-: . • ■ heqwrme 

Iht- -adida> ahoald i 

i.;- abosld piaeeliM atraai ^ ■- - * n iatdc aftfak 

■ a wm 

- ■ h **:-•:- •;*.-<-* tttal^M rA ca d c— j Chaftaal 

aaaira Tbecaovr^ u» 



■ 
li.c Boaaaa Efiai -. 
ombobc fto«a«Uc ibi 

■ 



■ 



■ie. 



Higher Acadm? 
■ 
in Med --ud Modern Hi*t method i 

. thzwd ta Greek aud Bmbi 

dH yea» Jtod &xm 

Hisur oauraea i& Ah rj 
Jlir .:j»ee i» Plaae aod Solid 



T0 



I 



*A* 






sin : 



MEli 



r I //AM/}' 












15 






studied- 



-;»" 









w 



nones*' 



. ^ ocean and the air win U a 
Laboratory work on the ri 
in d rocks and on the study ,, 
""ST* illustrative ol type forms in KCCfTl 

b , W ill be »-' 1 ^ is D ot required for entrance to TV 
ffhite^?. Arable for those who do note 
(jBiterfflty Jj »• a|s(| for those whoareprepari 
to*** i5 ^ taUgh t according to the labour. 

,aiod »itb 



teach 



careful observation and drawing. 

BIOLOGY 



l£*2!£«Z"* 






aviexpltf 1 



j B Geo©' .w -riuen ana oral dem 

^ S^vtral b^tf the ..^^ of the v^ar. 






up during 



typic 
studied 






***"* ^irf* 



the 
mall 

Jriod. TtebbomtoTTWorkicttnnpacies to studs 

rfitext-boofe. 

...tVQeDWe«tire tot* will be spent in 

tbe laboratory, and some time outside the laboratory 

iiioafor thetsejcif^, Single* time will 

be required for preparation autaide tbe laboratory tban 

ther subjects and more time aodei tbe eye of the 

:uctor, a Minor . or Biology will req 

tix hours of ttbml .^ a . 

tkMi wecfclj. 

« D«N. MiMi Stud« U will be given J 
Theae 



exRcaei 






»"««• n*. 8t»a« tl rt!t!^ r ' 0m *« mt «' 

JJWJ*. Expt, ^fnrovidad 

»*o n 









, both planta and animals will be studied. 

In Bwwff» hfi devo ted to each of the subject! 

One half - vear Tho i at est methods of labon. 

° f ** l °S SJ be used in both .abject.. In Jfoofcj,. 

tormaot tho several groups of animals will he 

cial attention will bo given to the tw 

Sucture and development. In Bobmy the structure 
^phology, and classification of the phanerogams an 
Sgh« cryptogams will be the principal topics treated. 
Nmpmnttag »ho t» pieal t.«Ui»wuI be stud,*. 
The preparation of an herbarium will be encouraged. 
but not demanded of students. 

In all laboratorvwork careful drawings and descrip- 
tions of all work done will be insisted upon, tbe object 
being to train the student to express what is b 
rather than to aid him to become accomplished in 
art of drawing and essay writing. Occasional excur- 
sions will be taken for the purpose of collecting epea- 
mens and also observing plants and animals in 
natural habits, environments, etc. 

OEBMAN. 

Three Majors will be offered as a course in Elev f* 
tary Qerman, three Majors in Intermediate, and thr* 
Majors in Advanced German. ,, f 

The aim in the Elementary course will be to en*' _ 
th * pupil to read easy German prose al ei S nt ' 
'torn his ear to thesounds of the language,**' 
hort answers in German 
Weal ions. 

?«™e in intermediate German is a conii"*"^ 
course, civinc a wider gran 



»poo (jfji,: . , — *«■• . .,.,. "*irj course, giving a wiuft j. i 

jtb the reading of a sidncientnun 






> 






and 



: of a larg< l,!arJ 

lR ■»!'! idioms. , 

MLtT"' Germa " Particular attention i* J'* 
***»*Q* Eighteenth Century. Tr,n*h>^ 



THE CA 

lt0W English into German and essay,, in Qe 

equired throughout the court v " n 



LEND IE 



PHKfi 



The work .(i French will co TO r two year., ft 

[ajorn being offered each year. The si ndy of t he I 
,j»r cover? the fundamentals of grammar and eyntax 
composition, and the reading of aeTeral hundred pi 
tfeasy modern French. The second year will include 

large amount of reading from Btandard authors, 

pit-reading, and composition. 



; 

te 



VI. MUSICAL DEPARTMENT. 

The Conservatory of Music, conducted by the Mi 
roll Seminary for many years, has made for itself 
an enviable reputation for the thoroughness and artis- 
tic excellence of its work. It has seemed best to con* 
tinue for the present, without material change, the 
course of study and methods marked out by Mrs. 
Isabel Dearborn Hazze n who remains as Director of 
the Conservatory. 

The work is rigidly graded and carried forward sys- 

matically as in other branches of study. The sys- 
em of daily lessons satisfactorily used for many years 
will be continued. 

The regular 



IMAM) COURSE, 



Ihieh pupils of average musical ability and industri- 
us habits may complete in three years, is divided into 
sii grades. A detailed statement of the work covered 
ia each grade may be obtained by application to the 
Dean, Students may enter any grade for which they 
are found qualified. Some previous knowledge of the 
rudiments of music are expected of pupils entering 
tbe regular course. Superior advantages, however, 
are provided for those beginning music 
Requirements for graduation in the Piano Course 

I include the work of the above mentioned six grades, 
together with Harmony, the Literary work required of 
d\ students in Music and Art (see p- 10), the History 
°f Music and the following selections memorized : one 
concerto; Mendelssohn G minor concerto, or equiv* 
**t; two Beethoven Sonatas: two Bach Fugu 
too groups of smaller solos. 

Per those who desire to continue in the school and 
ear ry their work to a greater degree of attainment, 
* Wo courses have been arranged requiring the follow 
°K elections memorized : 



«■ ADVANCED COURi 



Two Chopin fctudea Two Bach FW 

-SnKs.iss: ,*:• ■■■■'■ - - 

II- ftfXDAL 

~" Cho * im Swwta.of Beethoven Sonata, op U0 
7 « TO0 P e of «** solos each. Four concertos 

None but students of unusual musical ability are 
encouraged to complete the Medal Course. 

A demonstrative recital given before the Conserva- 
tory pupih is required of each graduate in the ad- 
vanced course, the programme us far as possible 
being memorized. 

For developing touch, phrasing and musical inter- 
pretation, the Sherwood method is used, combined 
with Mason's Touch and Technique. 

Careful attention is given to the use of pedals 
according to Schmidt. 

The course in Harmony is based on Brockhoven. 

Practice for developing strength and freedom of the 
lingers, wrists and arms is taken upon a technicon. 

ORGAN COURSE. 

The tirst and second grades in this course are equiv- 
alent to the first and second grades in the Pianoforte 
Course. These include : 

Bxercises in pedal-playing. 

Ilvmn-tune playing. 

Short modulations and elementary registration are 
given to prepare pupils to conduct successfully the 
usual church service. 

VOCAL OOCBSS. 

The tirst and most important consideration in voice- 
building is the establishment of correct breathing. 
This fart will be emphasised throughout the entire 
course. 

TIXHE OP VOCAL D017HSB. 

First and second grades. Exercises for tomvpro- 
duclion- **» breathing; elements of note 

singing. 
Third and fourth (rractes. Exercises in roadm- 

H n t 1 loIfeLio conUnued; exercises for articula- 
tion ami eouegB' M-irehesi's Studies in 
tion in English and Itehai 
Italian ; arias of moderate diftuilt) . 
ing. sight singing continued. 






iCAPt** 






(fOtt 



6rf» ^ 



'■■■ 



T0 






• dra* 



inff of fore-shortened hcarix 



,XlV^ --d crayon- Pen and** 

^ ,n Lu etilMi'e »n o.lsand water 
*lt. ^!^ f : nature .n various materia, 



^J r- 









, 90 a 



df** 1 > n inS 



i anatomy 









" Or 



, Drawing from the 
Third**"' " nre. Tuintui 



^of the - 



■MCI 






r^< ^ *" 






the tot a^ 

Rev * WT 

_ylar 



more difficult ao- 
g id water colors, 

JUg ^ especially desired. «* 

Painting of flowers, in the vanoui 
, f j, jeor. " ( the heftd and draped model, 

; JJJS'and related reading, sketching. 



from l» te - 



mciui. tovK^v: 



i h««. oomnleted the regular course, and 
P £en a vear ot advanced work. 



, ~ i « ♦;« hi* ar^ Given a >eor 

■**"*' C^fgold medal 

"£ Ligioa! studies from natnre. 

«„«.— J^Xia, used in the school. Th<^ « «- 

• *» rf to co»r* .to •» «* pectod to show I he pupils idea of composition in torn 
The ooDUowhoo ol tat course »»« «xi ■ mL _ „„.„ hn i am i B e;u,e. portrait, full 



Greater {amiiiarirj »«0 *• «acdard operas and 

Vocalises! n. 

Protrekticy ia agirteim: 

■Tledge of piano music eq^ial to third grade. 
TV final exisuDaticnv ^ of 

* recital programc.- &«L 

GOLD IttUL 

- 1 with £ne voices, 

<tbe 

I clamftcttioa i. deter 






nd color. They are to be landscape, portrait, lull 

^■tive<l raW i^M*ai.ublicbwiWin^ a« a revi« 
of perspective work done earlier in the course, 

d Borne art topic, approved by the instruc- 
ts written in the fali term. ( i 
This course is expected to Deed three hours" in- 
struction daily in the studio. 

KBgBlRED MTERAKY WORK FOK S'Tl'DKNTS 15 MUSH 
AND ART. 

Students making a specialty o! Music or Art are 
required tocomp] ire graduation the following 

course: 



ches 
■ German 

History 

Literature - 

w and Composition 

Hbta »y at Mueic or Art - 



6 Majors. 
C, Majors- 
;i Majors. 
3 Majore- 
;i Minors. 
3 Minors. 



jaof m , tur 

tf^r? nding in MiisiiT .mav , al the o 

wy Director and the IVan of the 

qub*l ^ offer substitute? for tt. 

ark. 






TIU 









-■-"■ : - * t ■ »- - - 






s: 



*tfr»e 



Vnartn 



" 



Tidtitn - .itkn fee - 

•B chaiet* except fcr 



v - ----- ... . 

^^Wt^*! fib '^ 






■M 



pee 

CSC 









v H 



' 



: 







" * '■""'- Dm uni -x «■ 






x 



■ - ill IL__ v- ,., IqprfM, „. ti> a a 

■^4>Mfi tAeas5fitesaB7 f«* tin* «ft& 






iteflT fcy swufta. C&axa&tr can 



JMUfeM 






I wail 

MM I Mi 



jwr riasVffL Vw *j? ,cxti -<3u&t f**i 

cafe 1 ."."■«. v 



'.:■-■ •; * ■ >-iT ■ !.:■- rtvn^B 



pwa^i 









Bfl 






IS 1 MB ' " ■"* 



.ivt--: r . « tatwiuft ^**" ,it *;^: * : -" ,; 






m '.* 






I -"' 



nb 






1AJ>SM I 



EL fail to pass 



tin- 



to be ^* e 

The 

hod***" . Hkt 



ire d bom tto* 



hool 



lace «h«T*' T 



with full 
helpful 



1Z~ •"*-" 



A. Bor ?■ .„ credit for U* J° u (B j x «« 






M PERSONAL CAS, 

personal attention Of tto DW"^ 
i„f„rm.ti..n that would .««t n * ^ ^ 

personal wpervwM <* a teae n " t p ecu H ar 

t to ,ee that these needs are pwpedj met «c«£ 



.- >. A 
; a dmi*^» to *- tuli y completed his 

f„rthcr«am« ation ; [Q two .thircls of their work 

*"£*»« «»<- JfJJ l t be permitted to H ect 
f,.r»nvterini«D wE »>» e Major or two 

Minors, if m t fie ' u ^ 

rfl secure better re 8 «lt, ^ when 

^T SSTtTi— f«m church. 
praeU f k i%; ££ irl chapel, and from study 
^^ST-eiWi* Students are espec- 

Irregularity of attend- 



„ d ««^E^S; Ss^S— to the removal of the 
^^^t-pU^^JJ^Jf; ^nCr^ew.Abeeueeeatthebegiumug 

"!?* "* -Tat the end of the quarter involve as eerioue 



progress to phvsical ireU-being or her need 4 medical 
assistance. Parents will be kept iDformed of their 
daughters physical condition as regularly as of their 
lectual progress. 



KIT. QENBBAL INFOEUATft 

L Sekttion of Uit C&tmt of Study* The work of the 

var of the Low Academy it the same for all 

students. At the beginning of the second year each 



less to the pupil as at any other time, cord 

of absences is made, and all students are expected. 
unless they are physically unable to do so, to obtain 
-excuses for their absences within twenty-four hours 

of the time when they were incurred, 

6. Absence from the Toim. No 
ucder any circumstances leave the 
permission previously obtained. 

T. Advantages of Home Residence. Students aro 



student may 
town without 



v*w»uiA n< in? u^Kiuuiug ui v ne eeconu year eacn „ .« --»— -v — ~.™ 

student will choose, with the advice of the Dean and . ici * 1: **en '* * s possible, to occupy rooms 

the approval of her parent*, the course beat adapted to in lhe Acalm y building. Students occupving such 
1 auto. Irregular courses are discour- ""ww** many distractions, come into very close 

contact with the We of the school, and are very likely 

Z**^\ . "* 001 * ork as the *™ thing demanding 
their best efforts. Th 



and 



1*!!™?**™*** Students who enter from 



advanced tout** « iU p^ ft £_,_„_ . lt! ^ 

at>d ateo written ex»S« ? ^* ^««.nation, 

«■' SfwlMft. Students «i» j_ 

to Ro to ccll^e will, u , rni n; * *J? *» •* iatcm 

In cam »bZ, , «" , «*b 
"■•ndAadh. 



.-iey are W to cultivate a healthy 

rit : re v ,nCe 8nd t0 ^ ain ««« their follow 

^htre cf SJ: J* " r ■« ho» association with 

"* B »W'»iid attractive pereonalitv. 

* te »t to the- ij: 4 »l*catloitt for rooms should 
~«n»stt* ^ J* ly w Possible, The 

fhen a room is engaged/ 
unless this deposit has 






«d 






to 
in 



the 



ma, and students will be allowed t, 
h houses as the Dean may approve Th£ 
; IUU st be secured before rooms are engaged. 

ms and Furnish ing*. Rooms are of different 
^Kftnd sizes; a)! are furnished with beds chairs 
areau, washetand, carpet and window 'shades' 
furnish shecte, pillowcases, blankets and 

H. All business communications should be ad 
jj^ed to the Dean. 



( - u ^/, l/; 






13 



eir 



U&fc 






Xtf/. 77/fT RELATION OF THE ACADEMY 
TO THE MT. CARROLL SEMINARY 4XD 
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO. 

lie school which for more than forty years has been 
bovn as Mt. Carrol] Seminary has, by the wish of its 
founder. Mrs. F. A. W. Shinier, become an affiliated 
school of The University of Chicago. It was Mrs 
Shiners desire at the outset to transfer the Seminary 
directly to The University. After much consideration 
er. it was decided that a separate Board of 
fees should be organized and take charge of the 
school. This has been done. The Board consists of 
ifteen members, representing The University of Chi- 
cago. the Alumme of the Seminary, and the citizens of 
Jit. Carroll. 

The relation of the Frances Shimer Academy to The 
Lwversity of Chicago is a double one. In the first 
't is an affiliated academy of The University, and 
such the work of instruction is under the direct 
ghtof The University. In the second place, eight 
f Mtcen trustees are trustees of The University. 
r£* ' his number are the President of The Un*i 
■reity Dr. YV. R. Harper ; the Vice President of the 
"1. and the Comptroller and Secretary. In order 
«phasize the intimate relation which the Academy 
^ Retain to The University, Professor F. J. Miller, 
- Diversity Examiner in the Department of Affilia- 
I ae V been . made tne Principal of the Academy and 
, a 1 ~r i \ of il 8 Board of Trustees, without in any 
%^ * nn * hi s relation to The University. While, 
Uoi Te ^'. tbe A^demy will sustain a relation to The 
tafej^ , J ^ intimate as to justify its name, it is an 
■ ent institution and seeks a constituency of its 



?2^CSP "* *- I- the 

. The greatest need of the FW « 
« in the line of buildi« rvT* Shiraor A ^ny 
«»d can be done in c an Ld !° tk has ***" *»i 
equipment; but the 2^^ and with P~ 
?ake e a place for tse t tmL, Jh ^ ** ° Wn ^ 
day must come into iL^i?,?* **l SCh ° olsof «"* 
modations and "„" "1 ^ ^ **«*» » accom 

fhe friends of the 



■-■■** nut 

and equipment. 



t^l ***■■■«*■ it ie hoped, will include all the among its lofty to*ft 
of Mt CarroJ] Seminary. The new school 



Academy and of mV Carro'i I ""^ 
opportunity to makTthT ™ ^ m,nary h ™ a < are 
new undertaking h P ? Wnt ° rucial **** ° r the 
they have ^^J* 8 "" * °< *— ^* than 

the W eZ e If b t U H ldiDg8 Bh ° U,d * PTOVided for W«™ 
the close of the year. One of these, which should 
espmally appeal to aI1 ^^ ^ ^ c^ ™ 

of Musics a building to be exclusively devoted to the 
Musical Department of the school. It should contain 
practice rooms with walls properly deadened and a 
concert hall for the public exercises of the Conser- 
vatory. This building should be made an artistic 
addition to the beautiful campus of the school and 
might well be named in honor of the woman whose 
persistent effort has made the Musical Conservatory 
of Mt. Carroll Seminary favorably known all over the 
country. 

The second building, which is imperatively de- 
manded at a very early date is one which wouM give thr 
greatest possible impetus to the prosperity of the Acad- 
emy. It should provide for a large daily assembly hall, 
laboratory, gymnasium and ample class rooms thor- 
oughly equipped for the best methods of instruction. 
The valuable collections left by the late Dr. Shimer 
would make an excellent start toward a scientific 
department second to none among secondary schools. 
For many years the work of the Seminary has been 
Irrgely carried on by the Associate -Principal, whose 
name does not so often appear as that of the founder 
of the school, but the abiding effect o ■*>>«£% 
wrought will be felt in the \«m of her pupils 
r»5 find expression in some substantia J lor.- 
If the Frances Shimer ^JJJJ* ,«, the 
„ong its lofty tree* »*"£*%* it ** 
old one restored into a modern 






THE '••'■•'• V 






, .1! Men* of the oM «**" 
Will tbe Alumna » rnen 



,/i/AV'-- " of |heir inter** fa. 

.mcc«"* f V t)CrB onally do to 
«< the T * *•*» th, - V W ' ft or by seeking 

l^ tll ,t the dosing ye^ 

outcome of 






AKriptioi" "" "• "■ , , e „ ire tbat tins pan ."« 
!°^ " ,|,.,t Ibe dosing year*